What Is The Point?

Have you ever asked yourself what the point of life is? Wouldn’t that be wonderful if we know why man was created? What would occur if we find the answer to this question? Would that make a difference? Would that drastically change our lifestyle?

Though many  answers have been provided to this question, we still wonder why we are here. Is it because we feel the answers don’t speak to us personally? Is it because by nature man is never satiated, and so he is always looking?

Many great thinkers who have dedicated their life to philosophy may have something to say about this question, but it all depends on how commensurable their answers are that open the way for denial.

If Plato got cornered to answer that question, he would say, after begging the question, that the point of life or the reason why man is created is to philosophize. One philosophizes by seeking wisdom (the truth and the good), and doing and holding on to the right thing regardless of the course. He went so far as to say that an unexamined life is not worth living. Also, know that the most known philosophers of the Socratic era is in line, though there may be some small differences, with Plato’s view of life. Aristotle, the stoics, or any rationalists for that matter would see eye to eye with him.  

The Epicureans, for example, would say that the point of life is to abstain oneself from pain and so to seek pleasure for that is the aim or end of all of us. Therefore, we should dedicate our whole life seeking what we were created for— a life of pleasure, which is absence of pain. The stoics would say that we cannot find ourselves in anything other than in self-control.

A rather more modern answer to this question is furnished by the enlightenment philosophers. For them, the point of life, the reason why man is created is to build an ordered, structured society where humanity lives in harmony with each other. All must have the freedom to exercise their inalienable rights originated from God. Man must do the best he can to keep his rights intact.

The Christian’s answer is nothing that we have heard before. The meaning of life is to find contentment—making the best out of God’s gift to us. That means living in pure love, and pure truth. Trust God. That signifies making God the center of our thoughts, actions, and lives. They are found in denying oneself to live for God. That answer seems to transcend Plato’s; one needs not examine his life philosophically in order to put God as the flambeau of his life. If it is in pain that God can be glorified, the Christian would gladly embrace it for in doing so he is living in perfect communion with God. Communion with God is everything; life is insignificant without God in it. Even if we have all, without God we have nothing. In fact, an un-Godly life is not worth living. While working to form a more just society is very important, doing so does not guarantee heaven.

Heaven is the very essence of the Christian’s answer. The meaning of life is to live for heaven, our true home and the zenith of our pilgrimage; that is what man is created for. Our life here on earth is a passing shadow, a journey, a bridge toward our true purpose in life.  If we fail that, we fail life. Who would want to overlook endless happiness? Well, now you know why you are here; what are you going to do about it? Delay it? That would be ok if you knew how long the journey would last. Reject it? I hope you understand what you are rejecting as well as you understand what I am urging you to embrace. Do nothing? Well, doing nothing means doing something. Wait! You are trapped! You have a choice to make my friend!

Have you ever asked yourself what the point of life is? Would not that be wonderful if we know why man was created? What would occur if we find the answer to this question? Could that make a difference? Would that drastically change our lifestyle?

Though many have answers have been provided to this question, we still wonder why we are here. Is it because we feel the answers don’t speak to us personally? Is it because by nature man is never satiated, and so he is always looking?

Many great thinkers who have dedicated their life to philosophy may have something to say about this question, but it all depends on how commensurable their answers are that open the way for denial.

If Plato got cornered to answer that question, he would say, after begging the question, that the point of life or the reason why man is created is to philosophize. One philosophizes by seeking wisdom (the truth and the good), and doing and holding on to the right thing regardless of the course. He went so far as to say that an unexamined life is not worth living. Also, know that the most known philosophers of the Socratic era is in line, though there may be some small differences, with Plato’s view of life. Aristotle, the stoics, or any rationalists for that matter would see eye to eye with him.  

The Epicureans, for example, would say that the point of life is to abstain oneself from pain and so to seek pleasure for that is the aim or end of all of us. Therefore, we should dedicate our whole life seeking what we were created for— a life of pleasure, which is absence of pain. The stoics would say that we cannot find ourselves in anything other than in self-control.

A rather more modern answer to this question is furnished by the enlightenment philosophers. For them, the point of life, the reason why man is created is to build an ordered, structured society where humanity lives in harmony with each other. All must have the freedom to exercise their inalienable rights originated from God. Man must do the best he can to keep his rights intact.

The Christian’s answer is nothing that we have heard before. The meaning of life is to find contentment—making the best out of God’s gift to us. That means living in pure love, and pure truth. Trust God. That signifies making God the center of our thoughts, actions, and lives. They are found in denying oneself to live for God. That answer seems to transcend Plato’s; one needs not examine his life philosophically in order to put God as the flambeau of his life. If it is in pain that God can be glorified, the Christian would gladly embrace it for in doing so he is living in perfect communion with God. Communion with God is everything; life is insignificant without God in it. Even if we have all, without God we have nothing. In fact, an un-Godly life is not worth living. While working to form a more just society is very important, doing so does not guarantee heaven.

Heaven is the very essence of the Christian’s answer. The meaning of life is to live for heaven, our true home and the zenith of our pilgrimage; that is what man is created for. Our life here on earth is a passing shadow, a journey, a bridge toward our true purpose in life.  If we fail that, we fail life. Who would want to overlook endless happiness? Well, now you know why you are here; what are you going to do about it? Delay it? That would be ok if you knew how long the journey would last. Reject it? I hope you understand what you are rejecting as well as you understand what I am urging you to embrace. Do nothing? Well, doing nothing means doing something. Wait! You are trapped! You have a choice to make my friend!

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